Eye Health

Periodic eye exams are an important part of routine preventive health care. Many eye and vision conditions present no obvious symptoms. Therefore, individuals are often unaware that a problem exists. Dr. Henry offers early diagnosis and treatment which are important for maintaining good vision and, when possible, preventing permanent vision loss.

The eye is the only organ where we can see active blood flow in your system without having to perform surgery. Often, systemic conditions are diagnosed in our exam room. Diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol are commonly diagnosed. Rarely and unfortunately, Dr. Henry has diagnosed stroke and malignant melanoma in the eye. With early detection, these more serious conditions can be treated and can ultimately save your life!

Within the last couple of years, there has been an influx of new, high tech equipment to assist doctors in diagnosing and treating eye and systemic conditions. These are essential both in a routine eye exam, for screening, and to assist in the treatment and maintenance of certain conditions, such as glaucoma and macular degeneration.

Come in and let Dr. Henry and the staff of Henry Vision Center provide you with a thorough exam, a complete diagnosis, and a treatment plan!

Learn About Eye Health

Amblyopia

Amblyopia is reduced vision in an eye that has not received adequate use during early childhood.

Amblyopia, also known as "lazy eye," has many causes. Most often it results from either a misalignment of a child's eyes, such as crossed eyes, or a difference in image quality between the two eyes (one eye focusing better than the other.) In both cases, one eye becomes stronger, suppressing the image of the other eye. If this condition persists, the weaker eye may become useless and vision loss may occur.

With early diagnosis and treatment, the sight in the "lazy eye" can be restored. The earlier the treatment, the better the opportunity to reverse the vision loss. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Astigmatism

Astigmatism may accompany farsightedness or nearsightedness. Usually it is caused by an irregularly shaped cornea (called corneal astigmatism). But sometimes lenticular astigmatism results from an irregularly shaped lens, which is located behind the cornea. Either kind of astigmatism can usually be corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses, or refractive surgery.

You may not notice small amounts of astigmatism at all or have just slightly blurred vision. But sometimes uncorrected astigmatism can give you headaches or eye strain and distort or blur your vision at all distances. Because not only adults can be astigmatic, you need to make sure you schedule an eye exam for your child. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Blepharitis

Blepharitis refers to inflammation of the eyelids, particularly at the lid margins. It's a common disorder and may be associated with a low-grade bacterial infection or a generalized skin condition.

Blepharitis occurs in two forms: anterior blepharitis and posterior blepharitis. Anterior blepharitis affects the outside front of the eyelid where the eyelashes are attached. The two most common causes are scalp dandruff and bacteria. Posterior blepharitis affects the inner eyelid and is caused by problems with the oil (meibomian) glands in the eyelid. Two skin disorders are the cause: acne rosacea and scalp dandruff.

Regardless of which type of blepharitis you have, you will probably have such symptoms as eye irritation, burning, tearing, foreign body sensation, crusty debris (in the lashes, in the corner of the eyes or on the lids), dryness and red eyelid margins. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Cataract

A cataract is a clouding of the eye's natural lens, which lies behind the iris and the pupil.

The lens works much like a camera lens, focusing light onto the retina at the back of the eye. The lens also adjusts the eye's focus, letting us see things clearly both up close and far away. The lens is mostly made of water and protein. The protein is arranged in a precise way that keeps the lens clear and lets light pass through it. But as we age, some of the protein may clump together and start to cloud a small area of the lens. This is a cataract, and over time, it may grow larger and cloud more of the lens, making it harder to see.

A cataract starts out small and at first has little effect on your vision. You may notice that your vision is blurred a little, like looking through a cloudy piece of glass or viewing an impressionist painting. A cataract may make light from the sun or a lamp seem too bright or glaring. Or you may notice when you drive at night that the oncoming headlights cause more glare than before. Colors may not appear as bright as they once did.

The type of cataract you have will affect exactly which symptoms you experience and how soon they will occur. When a nuclear cataract first develops, it can bring about a temporary improvement in your near vision, called "second sight." Unfortunately, the improved vision is short-lived and will disappear as the cataract worsens. On the other hand, a subcapsular cataract may not produce any symptoms until it's well-developed. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Computer Vision Syndrome

Computer vision syndrome (CVS) is a temporary condition resulting from focusing the eyes on a computer display for protracted, uninterrupted periods of time.

Some symptoms of CVS include headaches, blurred vision, neck pain, fatigue, eye strain, dry, irritated eyes, and difficulty refocusing the eyes. These symptoms can be further aggravated by improper lighting conditions (ie. bright overhead lighting or glare) or air moving past the eyes (e.g. overhead vents, direct air from a fan).

CVS affects adults and school age adolescents that routinely use a computer for work, school, and or personal interaction. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Conjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the conjunctiva, the thin, transparent layer that lines the inner eyelid and covers the white part of the eye.

The three main types of conjunctivitis are infectious, allergic and chemical. The infectious type, commonly called "pink eye," is caused by a contagious virus or bacteria. Your body's allergies to pollen, cosmetics, animals or fabrics often bring on allergic conjunctivitis. Finally, irritants like air pollution, noxious fumes and chlorine in swimming pools may produce the chemical form.

Common symptoms of conjunctivitis are red watery eyes, inflamed inner eyelids, blurred vision, a scratchy feeling in the eyes and, sometimes, a puslike or watery discharge. Conjunctivitis can sometimes develop into something that can harm vision. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetes is a disease that interferes with the body's ability to use and store sugar and can cause many health problems. One, called diabetic retinopathy, can weaken and cause changes in the small blood vessels that nourish your eye's retina, the delicate, light sensitive lining of the back of the eye. These blood vessels may begin to leak, swell or develop brush-like branches.

The early stages of diabetic retinopathy may cause blurred vision, or they may produce no visual symptoms at all. As the disease progresses, you may notice a cloudiness of vision, blind spots or floaters. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Dry Eye

The tears your eyes produce are necessary for overall eye health and clear vision. Dry eye means that your eyes do not produce enough tears or that you produce tears that do not have the proper chemical composition.

Often, dry eye is part of the natural aging process. It can also be caused by blinking or eyelid problems, medications like antihistamines, oral contraceptives and antidepressants, a dry climate, wind and dust, general health problems like arthritis or Sjogren's syndrome and chemical or thermal burns to your eyes.

If you have dry eye, your symptoms may include irritated, scratchy, dry, uncomfortable or red eyes, a burning sensation or feeling of something foreign in your eyes and blurred vision. Excessive dry eyes may damage eye tissue, scar your cornea (the front covering of your eyes) and impair vision and make contact lens wear difficult. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Floaters

You may sometimes see small specks or clouds moving in your field of vision; they are called floaters. Floaters are actually tiny clumps of gel or cells inside the vitreous, the clear jelly-like fluid that fills the inside of your eye. You can often see them when looking at a plain background, like a blank wall or blue sky.

Floaters may look like specks, strands, webs or other shapes. Actually, what you are seeing are the shadows of floaters cast on the retina, the light-sensitive part of the eye. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Glaucoma

Glaucoma is an eye disease in which the internal pressure in your eyes increases enough to damage the nerve fibers in your optic nerve and cause vision loss. The increase in pressure happens when the passages that normally allow fluid in your eyes to drain become clogged or blocked. The reasons that the passages become blocked are not known.

Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness in the U.S. It most often occurs in people over age 40. People with a family history of glaucoma, African Americans, and those who are very nearsighted or diabetic are at a higher risk of developing the disease. Please contact Dr. Henry for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Hyperopia

Hyperopia, or farsightedness, is a common vision problem, affecting about a fourth of the population. People with hyperopia can see distant objects very well, but have difficulty focusing on objects that are up close.

Farsighted people sometimes have headaches or eye strain and may squint or feel fatigued when performing work at close range. If you get these symptoms while wearing your eyeglasses or contact lenses, you may need an eye exam and a new prescription. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Keratoconus

Often appearing in the teens or early twenties, keratoconus is a progressive eye disease in which the normally round cornea thins and begins to bulge into a cone-like shape. This cone shape deflects light as it enters the eye on its way to the light-sensitive retina, causing distorted vision. Keratoconus can occur in one or both eyes.

Keratoconus can be difficult to detect, because it usually develops so slowly. However, in some cases, it may proceed rapidly. As the cornea becomes more irregular in shape, it causes progressive nearsightedness and irregular astigmatism to develop, creating additional problems with distorted and blurred vision. Glare and light sensitivity also may be noticed.

Keratoconic patients often have prescription changes every time they visit their eye care practitioner. It's not unusual to have a delayed diagnosis of keratoconus because of the development of the disease in the early-stages. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in America. It results from changes to the macula, a portion of the retina that is responsible for clear, sharp vision, and is located at the back of the eye.

Most people with macular degeneration have the dry form, for which there is no known treatment. The less common wet form may respond to laser procedures, if diagnosed and treated early.

Some common symptoms are a gradual loss of ability to see objects clearly, distorted vision, a gradual loss of color vision and a dark or empty area appearing in the center of vision. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Myopia

Nearsightedness, or myopia, is a vision problem experienced by up to about one-third of the population. Nearsighted people have difficulty reading highway signs and seeing other objects at a distance, but can see for up-close tasks such as reading or sewing.

Nearsighted people often have headaches or eye strain and might squint or feel fatigued when driving or playing sports. If you experience these symptoms while wearing your glasses or contact lenses, you may need a comprehensive eye examination as well as a new prescription. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Ocular Hypertension

Ocular hypertension means the pressure in your eye, or your intraocular pressure (IOP), is higher than normal levels. Elevated IOP is also associated with glaucoma, which is a more serious condition that causes vision loss and optic nerve damage. By itself, however, ocular hypertension doesn't damage your vision or eyes.

You can't tell by yourself that you have ocular hypertension, because there are no outward signs such as pain or redness. At each eye exam, your eyecare practitioner will measure your IOP and compare it with normal levels. Please contact Dr. Henry for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Ocular Migraines

Ophthalmic (eye) migraines are quite common and often painless, although the solo term "migraine" usually brings to mind a severe type of headache. But with eye-related migraines, visual disturbances with or without headache pain also can accompany migraine processes thought to be related to changes in blood flow in the brain. These visual problems associated with migraines technically are known as ophthalmic migraines, but are much more commonly (though incorrectly) called ocular migraines. Because most laypeople understand the term better, this article refers to the condition as "ocular migraine."

During migraine processes, changes also may take place in blood flow to the area of the brain responsible for vision (visual cortex or occipital lobe). Resulting ophthalmic or ocular migraines commonly can produce visual symptoms even without a headache.

People with ocular migraines can have a variety of visual symptoms. Typically you will see a small, enlarging blind spot (scotoma) in your central vision with bright, flickering lights (scintillations) or a shimmering zig-zag line (metamorphopsia) inside the blind spot. The blind spot usually enlarges and may move across your field of vision. This entire migraine phenomenon may end in only a few minutes, but usually lasts as long as about 20-30 minutes. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Pinguecula

Pingueculae are yellowish, slightly raised lesions that form on the surface of the white part of your eye (sclera) close to the edge of the cornea.

They are typically found in the open space between your eyelids (palpebral fissure), which also happens to be the area exposed to the sun. While pingueculae are more common in middle-aged or older people who spend a lot of time in the sun, they can also be found in younger people and even children — especially those who are often outdoors without protection such as sunglasses or hats.

In most people, pingueculae cause few symptoms. But a pinguecula that is irritated might create a feeling that something is in the eye. In some cases, pingueculae become swollen and inflamed, a condition called pingueculitis. Irritation and eye redness from pingueculitis usually result from exposure to sun, wind, dust or extremely dry conditions. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Presbyopia

Presbyopia describes the condition where the eye exhibits a progressively diminished ability to focus on near objects with age.

Presbyopia's exact mechanisms are not known with certainty, however, the research evidence most strongly supports a loss of elasticity of the crystalline lens, although changes in the lens's curvature from continual growth and loss of power of the ciliary muscles (the muscles that bend and straighten the lens) have also been postulated as its cause.

Similar to grey hair and wrinkles, presbyopia is a symptom caused by the natural course of aging; the direct translation of the condition's name is "elder eye".

When people develop presbyopia, they find they need to hold books, magazines, newspapers, menus and other reading materials at arm's length in order to focus properly. When they perform near work, such as embroidery or handwriting, they may develop headaches, eye strain or feel fatigued. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Pterygium

Pterygia are wedge- or wing-shaped growths of benign fibrous tissue with blood vessels (fibrovascular), typically located on the surface of the sclera.

In extreme cases, pterygia may grow onto the eye's cornea and interfere with vision. Because a pterygium resembles tissue or film growing over the eye, a person who has one may become concerned about personal appearance. As with pingueculae, prolonged exposure to ultraviolet light from the sun may play a role in the formation of pterygia.

Many people with pterygia do not experience symptoms or require treatment. Some pterygia may become red and swollen on occasion, and some may become large or thick. This may cause concern about appearance or create a feeling of having a foreign body in the eye. Large and advanced pterygia can actually cause a distortion of the surface of the cornea and cause astigmatism. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Retinal Detachment

A detached retina is a serious and sight-threatening event, occurring when the retina becomes separated from its underlying supportive tissue. The retina cannot function when these layers are detached. And unless the retina is reattached soon, permanent vision loss may result.

If you suddenly notice spots, floaters and flashes of light, you may be experiencing the warning signs of a detached retina. Your vision might become blurry, or you might have poor vision. Another sign is seeing a shadow or a curtain descending from the top of the eye or across from the side. These signs can occur gradually as the retina pulls away from the supportive tissue, or they may occur suddenly if the retina detaches immediately. No pain is associated with retinal detachment. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Strabismus

Strabismus is a condition where your eyes don't look toward the same object together.

Strabismus may be caused by unequal pulling of muscles on one side of the eye or a paralysis of the ocular muscles. One eye moves normally, while the other points in (esotropia or "crossed eyes"), out (exotropia), up (hypertropia) or down (hypotropia).

Strabismus can lead to amblyopia. Strabismus is the physical disorder, and amblyopia is the visual consequence. Newborns often have crossed eyes due to a lack of developed vision, but this disappears as the infant grows. True strabismus does not disappear as the child grows. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Stye (Hordeolum/Chalazions)

A stye (also spelled "sty") develops when a gland at the edge of the eyelid becomes infected. A stye is caused by staphylococcal bacteria. Resembling a pimple on the eyelid, a stye can grow on the inside or outside of the lid. A stye is not harmful to vision, and it can occur at any age. A stye also is known as a hordeolum.

The first signs of a stye are pain, redness, tenderness and swelling in the affected area; then a small pimple appears. Sometimes just the immediate area is swollen; at other times, the entire eyelid swells. With a stye, you may notice frequent watering in the affected eye, increased light sensitivity and a feeling like something is in the eye. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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Uveitis

Uveitis is inflammation of the eye's uvea. The uvea is the eye's middle layer that consists of the iris, ciliary body and choroid.

Uveitis is classified by which part of the uvea it affects. Anterior uveitis refers to inflammation of the iris alone (called iritis) or the iris and ciliary body. Anterior uveitis is the most common form. Intermediate uveitis refers to inflammation of the ciliary body. Posterior uveitis is inflammation of the choroid. Diffuse uveitis is inflammation in all areas of the uvea.

Many cases of uveitis are chronic, and they can produce numerous possible complications, including clouding of the lens (cataract) or cornea, elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), glaucoma, and retinal problems (such as swelling of the retina or retinal detachment). These complications can result in vision loss. Uveitis occurs most frequently in people ages 20 to 50.

With anterior uveitis, your symptoms will likely affect only one eye. You will feel mild to strong pain and will have redness and light sensitivity. Your vision may also be blurred. Both intermediate and posterior uveitis are usually painless. Symptoms are blurred vision and floaters, typically in both eyes. Most people who develop intermediate uveitis are in their teens, 20s or 30s. Diffuse uveitis has a combination of symptoms of all types of uveitis. Please contact Dr. Henry as soon as you experience any of these symptoms for a thorough exam, diagnosis, and treatment at (770) 474-5617.

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STOCKBRIDGE, GA 30281
 
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